Let's talk about albinism and debunk myths

FILE IMAGE: People living with Albinism at an event hosted by Wretched Woman's Diary in Tembisa. The event discussed social issues affecting people with albinism.
FILE IMAGE: People living with Albinism at an event hosted by Wretched Woman's Diary in Tembisa. The event discussed social issues affecting people with albinism.
Image: Thulani Mbele

I wonder why I see few people who live with albinism on television. It's rare to see  adverts showing people who live with albinism.

I think it's time to teach our children about people who live with albinism. Most people are unnecessarily shocked, scared or laugh at people who live with albinism because they do not know better.

Myths and superstition also do not help as they fuel misplaced hate against our own sisters and brothers. Albinism is a genetic disorder that results in decreased production of a pigment called melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes, resulting in light colour or no colour.

They go through a lot as they also have to deal with taking care of their skin and eyes. People with albinism are also sensitive to the effects of the sun, so they are also at risk of developing skin cancer. Let's talk educate people about albinism and support and welcome people living with it. 

Sara Makala, Three Rivers 

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