EFF march defied lockdown rules

EFF supporters march through Phoenix to register their grievances against the killing of black people during recent unrest.
EFF supporters march through Phoenix to register their grievances against the killing of black people during recent unrest.
Image: Mluleki Mdletshe

The march against “Indian racism” last Thursday by EFF in Phoenix sent mixed feelings around. The EFF marchers failed to respect the lockdown rules in defiance of the government of President Cyril Ramaphosa. The event was just a super-spreader as is a norm with EFF marches these days.

Very few marchers had masks on, there was no social distancing, and the limit of gatherings was exceeded multiple times. All these done by the party that wants postponement of the local government elections because elections would be risking the lives of voters.

Since the EFF took the stance to sympathise with jailed ex-president Jacob Zuma, they seem to be blinded by the new-found love. They fight anything and everything against actions of the Zuma protectors. Maybe they want to lure the vote of the disgruntled RET faction.

The looting happened in the name of Zuma, they therefore fail to address looting that threatened the advancement of the very economic freedom agenda they advocate. The speakers rightly condemned racism, but they ruined the message through biased rhetoric.

It seemed as if anyone of Indian origin is a racist and participated in the barbaric assault and killings aimed at black people. It is true there is a bunch of radical and latent racism apologists in well-off communities, who ward off other races from living with them.

The unleashing of these latent racial attacks was triggered by fear of falling victim to mass looting. The EFF used provocative messages laced with pro-black racist undertones. It is a known fact that when a person feels attacked, he switches to a defensive mode, making it difficult to bring him to self-introspection.

Kgothatso Mphuthi, Tshiawelo, Soweto

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