25 years later, the ruling party still cannot fulfil its mandate on inequality

Finance Minister Tito Mboweni's turnaround plan is just a symptom of the ANC's inability to come to terms with the necessity to provide definitive ideological clarity for themselves and society at large, the writer says.
Finance Minister Tito Mboweni's turnaround plan is just a symptom of the ANC's inability to come to terms with the necessity to provide definitive ideological clarity for themselves and society at large, the writer says.
Image: Robert Tshabalala

The ANC was elected in 1994 with a clear mandate to redress the inequalities of the past in every sphere: political, social and economic.

Yet, SA remains one of the world's most unequal society.

Of yet greater concern is that policies over the past 25 years have only served to deepen and entrench poverty, unemployment and inequality among the masses.

"Radical Economic Transformation" was a campaign slogan of the ruling party alliance during the recent general election.

To be fair, it is possible that such policies would have more appeal among ordinary ANC activists and conference delegates than the country.

The fact is that the ANC has for years been troubled by trying to serve the interests of all classes and being everything to everybody, at the expense of the poor black majority who suffer the brunt of 'racial capitalism' and whose interests after 1994 should have been the utmost priority.

Tito Mboweni's 77-page turnaround plan, with some saying that he should have consulted wider, is just symptomatic of the ANC's own inability to come to terms with the necessity to provide definitive ideological clarity for themselves, let alone society at large, and I am not sure if they will ever reach such a point.

Dr Amos Sekhaulelo, email

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