Police must revisit their oath of office

Police must revisit their oath of office.
Police must revisit their oath of office.
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Cops have been failing the citizens by not doing their jobs effectively. Theirs is to work with the communities to uproot the scourge of crime.

However, it is the police who do not act swiftly whenever the residents report incidents of crime, leaving the drug lords to operate their illegal businesses as they please and right under their noses.

The residents of Westbury, in Johannesburg, who have been protesting violently this week, did so to voice their concerns about crime and drug dealing in the area.

Unfortunately the cops, who are meant to come to their rescue, are the ones who take bribes from the criminals.

We are thus fighting a losing battle as long as police officers are in cahoots with the criminals. Taking a bribe is corruption, which in turn becomes a stumbling block to safety and security.

All those who have chosen to be part of the police force shouldn't forget the oath they took; they were sworn into office to serve with loyalty and honesty.

I know that police officers' work is not an easy one, but that should not translate to them selling out the communities to the criminals.

It is not a good thing to see police and residents exchanging fire and petrol bombs.

I appeal to the government to try to separate the wolves from the sheep, and to hire highly trained and disciplined police officers who will take their oath of office seriously.

Police rifles should not be used to harm law-abiding citizens, but to target the criminals who have rendered our country ungovernable.

I also appeal to communities not to use violence to raise their grievances. Violence can only breed more violence and untimely death.

Police minister Bheki Cele should always avail himself and take a keen interest in what the communities are complaining about.

Amos Tebeila

Mohlaletse, Mpumalanga

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