Spare us Trump's insanity, and bad reality shows on TV

US President Donald Trump.
US President Donald Trump.
Image: YURI GRIPAS/AFP PHOTO

I have spent the last few weeks wondering if I have, in my old age, become an insufferable sanctimonious woman.

Every time I see a headline mention Trump I desperately want for the Christians to be right about Jesus coming back so he can fetch all of us urgently.

How have we as the world, as a society, allow a ground fertile enough for a man like that to be the president of a such a big economy?

Bit by bit I have come to realise that the many little things we brush off as little, as negligible, eventually snowball into the decay that informs our lives.

About a week ago Trump tweeted, in retaliation to Iran, that should they try anything, the US would respond with trillions of war ammunition it had just purchased. This tweets alone warrant for Jesus to put on his sandals and hurry back.

Flint, in Michigan, has not had clean drinking water for years. Yet the government finds it better to spend money on a war no one needs versus the violation of basic human rights. Those people deserve water and instead they need to look on as their tax money is used for one man's childish indulgences.

Is it illegal? It's not and so the burning question has become, at least to me, is it ethical?

We have condoned a lot of events because they are legal; we fail to fully interrogate the ethics of those events and actions. Do these events, actions and business practices, serve society positively.

What is our collective responsibility in holding people accountable for their misdemeanours?

Locally, I saw, last year talks of a reality TV show following the lives of former president Jacob Zuma.

While the former leader was never convicted of anything, there are too many things surrounding him. His presidency was peppered with way too many a hint at scandals which has contributed to the moral decay of the country.

I personally do not see why this country needs to watch that man giggle on television when the poor people in this country live on the brink of death daily. Granted we do not need any of the reality television that is thrust into our living rooms and into the minds of our children.

I had the misfortune of watching the new reality television show that follows the life of the obscenely rich Shauwn Mkhize, once a carrier of the controversial Mpisane surname.

Just from the first episode it seems the show is going to be a show-off of how rich and lavishly she and her family live. Is that what entertainment has come down to?

Once again, there is nothing wrong on the surface about a show that features a boy who is still in school, bragging about spending R87,000 on shoes, and goes on to say that he knows that someone could use it to build a four-room house. Surely, rich people can spend their money without making us poor people the butt of their jokes.

The loss of journalism to the PR world means we have been exposed to a litany of articles on the show and and its "brilliance". But before you call me a grinch, remember Trump was a reality TV star. Today he is teasing a world war.

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