Hypocritical rubbish to suggest EFF leaders shouldn't enjoy finer things in life

09 July 2019 - 10:23
By Palesa Lebitse
Marianne Thamm went through the  EFF's trash and found gold.  However, she didn't tell us what was the motive of whoever tipped her off. Could they have acted out of racism, the writer asks.
Image: Foto24 Marianne Thamm went through the EFF's trash and found gold. However, she didn't tell us what was the motive of whoever tipped her off. Could they have acted out of racism, the writer asks.

Remember when Carien du Plessis labelled women pantypreneurs in a tweet? Although Du Plessis apologised, the reasoning was that there was indeed a "problem of young women convening at the ANC's celebrations looking for fun and fortune with politicians in exchange for sexual favours and/or affairs".

Of course, the derogatory comment has been dead and buried for years, but I was recently reminded of it when I read Marianne Thamm's "Revolutionary trash sometimes requires trash journalism, literally".

But before I delve into what bothered me most, I must state that I am going to write this piece in very simple English to avoid any condescending policing by the English gods.

In any case, always keep in mind that English is not my first language and not even my second. That said, while the article aimed to expose senior members or leaders of the EFF as nothing but sorry hypocrites, and they may well be, I was concerned more about the way the article portrayed women.

Who are these faceless and nameless women referred to? The tone of Thamm's article tacitly reduced these "young women who were seen leaving the house" to prostitutes - at least that is how I read and digested it.

I say this fairly having made reference to the "used condoms" and "boxes of discarded unused condoms".

Am I the only person tired of people insulting young black women? I seriously doubt there were any white women there.

The story itself was vindictive and vile. I must state, I have no problem that Thamm went through the trash and found gold.

However, she didn't tell us what was the motivation of whoever tipped her off - could they have acted out of racism, did the EFF members make a nuisance and perhaps the noise was reported to the authorities?

We should question this report and how it plays back into anti-black racism and hatred for the EFF because of the threat it poses to continued white dominance and supremacy of the economy.

Is it OK for journalists, unless they harbour these anti-black, anti-EFF sentiments, to adopt "my enemy's enemy is my friend" attitude - playing into the hands of anti-black haters?

But fundamentally, the idea that socialists, communists and the like betray their ideology because they enjoy expensive whiskey and wine is really disingenuous.

Are we supposed to believe that only liberals, conservatives and democrats may enjoy the finer things in life? This is absurd and, speaking of democrats, I am now dying to know if Mmusi Maimane is indeed a democrat, I believe his trash can tell us. My point is, where is the consistency?

Thamm said (referring to the EFF) "if you would like to project yourselves as revolutionaries, as guardians of the poor and the marginalised, then you should also walk the talk".

It is particularly a false notion that EFF leaders and members who wear Louis Vuitton, for example, are hypocrites. Wearing certain clothes and drinking certain alcohol does not change their politics nor does it change their policy position.

Instead, hypocrites are those who claim to be pro-poor but have free market policies, like the ANC.

The SACP are hypocrites for forming an alliance with a party that has faith in and has implemented neo-liberal policies since the dawn of democracy. The SACP care only to maintain their patronage benefit. My point is: it is unethical for a journalist to try to influence how a political party is perceived by citizens. It is vile and should be condemned.