×

We've got news for you.

Register on SowetanLIVE at no cost to receive newsletters, read exclusive articles & more.
Register now

Expect rain at Easter and above average downpours inland for autumn and winter

A composite image taken at 11am on Tuesday showing the cyclonic swirl of deep convective cloud associated with heavy rain, just off the southern coastline of KwaZulu-Natal.
A composite image taken at 11am on Tuesday showing the cyclonic swirl of deep convective cloud associated with heavy rain, just off the southern coastline of KwaZulu-Natal.
Image: SA Weather Service

SA is likely to experience above normal rainfall in the northeast and below normal rainfall in the southwest during late autumn and early winter.

That's according to a multimodel rainfall forecast by the SA Weather Service (Saws) on expected weather patterns between April and August.

“Temperatures are expected to be above normal for most of the country with the exception of minimum temperatures over the southern parts,” Saws said in its seasonal climate watch brief issued at the end of March.

“The expected above normal rainfall for the northeastern parts of the country during late autumn to early winter provides a good opportunity for water reservoirs to replenish in the summer rainfall regions.”

Saws said there was likely to be an increased risk for waterlogging in areas receiving excessive rainfall that could cause crop damage. “However, the southwestern part, which normally receives significant rainfall during early winter, is expected to receive mostly below normal rainfall.

“Decision makers are encouraged to advise farmers in these regions to practise soil and water conservation, proper water harvesting and storage and other appropriate farming practices.”

The SA Aviation Centre, a division of the Saws, said: “Autumn and winter are not generally our wet months unless you live in the west. But according to Saws, the tables have turned.”

In a report on Tuesday, Saws said: “Rain is expected to return to many of our provinces before and during the Easter weekend when many people will be travelling to other parts of the country.

“The public are urged to monitor forecasts and warnings issued by Saws.”

The rain could not immediately be attributed to global warming and climate change.

“As weather scientists, we cannot attribute individual weather events occurring on short timescales to longer-term events occurring over years or decades. However, we can state with confidence that globally, as a direct result of global warming and associated climate change, all forms of severe and extreme weather — such as heatwaves, heavy rain and coastal storm surges — are becoming more frequent and more extreme.

“Heavy rain can be expected to recur in the future and with increasing frequency.”

TimesLIVE

Support independent journalism by subscribing to the Sunday Times. Just R20 for the first month.


Would you like to comment on this article?
Register (it's quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

Commenting is subject to our house rules.