KZN class of 2021 pledges not to cheat in matric exams

Nivashni Nair Senior reporter
Western Cape education MEC Debbie Schäfer has warned matrics against cheating. File photo.
Western Cape education MEC Debbie Schäfer has warned matrics against cheating. File photo.
Image: Gallo Images/Die Burger/Jaco Marais

Four days before the class of 2021 begins its final examinations, KwaZulu-Natal matric pupils pledged not to cheat.

On Friday, provincial education MEC Kwazi Mshengu visited Lamontville High School, south of Durban, where pupils signed a pledge not to participate in activities that will compromise the integrity of the 2021 National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations.

“Apart from the work we have put in place to make sure all officials are properly trained to conduct credible examination process, I am sure you have seen our pupils signing a pledge committing themselves not to participate in activities that will compromise the integrity of the 2021 NSC exams."

“While pupils were signing the pledge at Lamontville High, similar activities were taking place, not only in KwaZulu-Natal but throughout the country,” he said.

Mshengu said the pledge showed the extent to which his department was serious about conducting examinations that were free from irregularities.

“We are persuaded that our officials and pupils are going to be equal to the task,” he said.

Invigilators were trained to focus on the prevention of malpractices, loss of answer scripts and accountability for question papers

The department compiled a comprehensive plan to manage “all kinds of risks” related to examinations.

“Our plan looks at measures to prevent a compromise of the printing job in case of load-shedding, looks at our working relationship with the joints operations committee, the delivery of examination material during days with inclement weather and a possible escalation of exam malpractices.

“As a department we are serious about conducting examinations that are without irregularities. You can report any suspected irregularities in the NSC examinations to the WhatsApp number 069-335-2818. We can assure you the information provided in this regard will be handled with confidentiality.”

About 178,262 full-time candidates and 22,845 part-time candidates will sit for the examinations.

As a department we needed to do things differently and pull out all stops to ensure the class of 2021 had a fighting chance in life.
KZN education MEC Kwazi Mshengu

Mshengu was pleased to report that more girls were writing the examinations than boys this year.

“This is important to us because we have always maintained that if we are to realise gender parity and win our struggle against patriarchy and unjust power relations, we need to expose our pupils to opportunities and equip them with skills that will empower them for the future."

He said the 2021 academic year was difficult for his department and pupils.

“When we started this academic year later than normal, we already knew this year would be a year like no other, but we got our strength from the class of 2020, who being the first cohort to have an academic year marred by Covid-19, managed to weather the storms and succeed against all odds.

“The closure of schools, alternating of classes and other challenges that came as a result of Covid-19 meant that as a department we needed to do things differently and pull out all stops to ensure the class of 2021 had a fighting chance in life.

“As if the difficulties visited on us by Covid-19 were not enough, the civil unrest we experienced as a country did not help the situation. Despite all that, the KwaZulu-Natal department of education is ready for the 2021 NSC examinations.”

TimesLIVE


Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments? Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.