No, Zuma will not address his supporters at Nkandla, says foundation

Former president Jacob Zuma's Nkandla homestead is the subject of a hearing in the Pietermaritzburg high court. File photo.
Former president Jacob Zuma's Nkandla homestead is the subject of a hearing in the Pietermaritzburg high court. File photo.
Image: REUTERS/Rogan Ward

Jacob Zuma's foundation has refuted reports that the former president will be addressing his supporters following his release from hospital. 

The foundation cleared the air this week after The Witness reported that Zuma would make his first virtual appearance at Nkandla since being granted medical parole. 

It said the report was “fake news” and an “unnecessary invasion”.

“Any public appearance that Zuma wishes to make will be announced as such. Please consider everything fake news until the foundation announces otherwise,” said the foundation on its social media page. 

Zuma was admitted to a military hospital for medical treatment in August, shortly after he began serving his 15-month jail term at the Estcourt Correctional Centre for contempt of court.  

His undisclosed illness saw him granted medical parole by the department of correctional services and he will complete the rest of his sentence in a “system of community corrections”.

Last week, TimesLIVE reported that Zuma had returned to Nkandla after being discharged from hospital.

His family told Sunday Times Daily Zuma was not his “charming and ever-laughing self”.

“Yes, he is home but he is not well. Yazi, even when you look at him, he is not the charming and ever-laughing JZ who is full of jokes,” said Zuma's nephew, who asked not to be named.

Earlier this month, Zuma's spokesperson Mzwanele Manyi told TimesLIVE Zuma's release from prison meant he “can be with family and sleep in his own bed”. 

“The development means that the man who has been incarcerated without trial and denied the right to appeal his verdict is now given an opportunity to be with his family, though under conditions. 

“This is a light at the end of a tunnel. At least he can be with family, sleep in his own bed and wake up and see his grandchildren,” said Manyi.

Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments? Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.