Richard Maponya 'believed in teaching a man how to fish'

Black business formations hosted a memorial service for the late Dr Richard Maponya at Regenesys Business School in Sandton.
Black business formations hosted a memorial service for the late Dr Richard Maponya at Regenesys Business School in Sandton.
Image: Veli Nhlapo

He still signed his cheques, attended his board meetings and was planning his diary for the week in which he died.

These are some of the interesting details shared by those who worked closely with the late Richard Maponya at his memorial service in Sandton on Friday.

Ladi Addelusi, who worked with the iconic businessman, said Maponya was a hard-working man who did not believe in retirement.

Addelusi said while well into his late 90s, banks would still call Maponya to verify his cheques which he still used.

Maponya also used the time in business to teach life lessons to the young.

"He believed in teaching a man how to fish so as to have food for the rest of his life rather than giving a man a fish which he will eat once and come back to ask again," said Addelusi.

"He believed in the Ghanaian proverb which says a healthy beggar is an insult to the generous farmer."

He said while Maponya was a disciplinarian he had a sense of humour.

"He would always call me to order when I was wrong.

"I was with him on Thursday January 2 and he still gave me a number of instructions. Part of the instructions was to discuss the week starting January 6. He wanted to expand the Maponya Institute; unfortunately he left us in the early hours on Monday," Addelusi said.

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