Guards set to protest over missing provident fund money

security guards from Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services are set to protest over missing provident fund money
security guards from Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services are set to protest over missing provident fund money
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Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services is scrambling to keep 400 security guards from downing tools after it failed to pay their provident funds, following a determination made by the Pension Fund Adjudicator (PFA).

About 40 of the 400 employees lodged complaints with the PFA after their pension funds could not be accounted for.

Reshebile had been deducting R300 a month from the workers' salaries, which went to Senpef provident fund, administered by WSM Employee Benefit Administrators.

In November, the PFA ordered that Reshebile should submit all outstanding contribution schedules in order to facilitate the calculation of their outstanding withdrawal benefit within three weeks of the determination.

It further instructed the company to calculate the complainants' outstanding contributions, together with late payment interest owed by the company within a week of receiving the contribution schedules.

One of the security officers who took Reshebile to the PFA said he was upset with the company's reluctance to return his contributions.

"I have been sent from pillar to post about this matter. Nobody is willing to help us, even though we were found to be right.

"We want our money because we worked for it and it was taken from our salaries and cannot be accounted for," said the security officer who asked not to be named.

Sowetan reported last year that the company defaulted for 10 months on contributions towards the fund for 400 security workers at OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg.

Shadrack Dladla, managing director of Reshebile, said the pension fund issues would be addressed in a meeting that was scheduled to be held today.

"We accept that the payments are in arrears at the moment and that is why we have a meeting with the employees on tomorrow [tomorrow]. We have had some financial difficulties with clients failing to pay the company and that is one of the reasons why we are behind. But we are hoping to resolve this after the meeting," Dladla said.

However, Evans Nyathi from the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa said it was not aware of a meeting between the parties.

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