'Detractors trying to silence EFF ahead of elections' - Malema

EFF spokesperson Mbuyiseni Ndlozi and leaderJulius Malema follow proceedings at a public manifesto consultation assembly with workers in the safety sector in Tshwane yesterday.
EFF spokesperson Mbuyiseni Ndlozi and leaderJulius Malema follow proceedings at a public manifesto consultation assembly with workers in the safety sector in Tshwane yesterday.
Image: Phill Magakoe

EFF leader Julius Malema has claimed that his party was being linked to the looting of VBS Mutual Bank to discredit it ahead of next year's elections.

Yesterday, Malema received inputs from thousands of workers in the security sector in Pretoria which he said will form part of the party's manifesto for the 2019 general elections.

Malema accused VBS investigators of seeking to link his party to the bank's collapse.

"Let me tell why they are accusing the EFF of eating VBS money. They are trying to silence us. The EFF is the one that confronts white corruption in South Africa. They are trying to silence the EFF through concocted allegations of corruption, which are nonexistent," Malema said.

"There were four ministers who had bonds with VBS but when they investigated they said shift this because we want EFF. We've got the transcript of the interview when they were investigating VBS. Every person who was interviewed was asked 'did you give money to Malema, did you give EFF money? That investigation was about EFF but it was never called [to answer]."

Last month a report by advocate Terry Motau SC, commissioned by the Reserve Bank, listed EFF deputy president Floyd Shivambu's brother, Brian, as one of the people who were paid millions of rand from the bank. The report detailed how Sgameka, a company owned by Brian, received more than R16m from VBS.

The EFF had denied any involvement in the collapse of the bank. Malema said the party would continue to fight for the in-sourcing of security guards as it has done in Tshwane and Johannesburg municipalities.

He said SA would not be where it is today if it were not for the EFF's anti-graft stance.

"Ramaphosa would not be president today if it was not for the EFF. We fight and the people say these kids do not have respect," he said.

He added that it was difficult for SA to have peace as it is an unequal society. "An unequal society is a threat to peace and prosperity. Those who are at a lower level economically do not have anything to lose. One day they will rise against those who are at the top of the economy."

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