'Credible leaders needed to fix SA'

President Cyril Ramaphosa receives a courtesy call from former US president Bill Clinton and former secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton at the summit yesterday.
President Cyril Ramaphosa receives a courtesy call from former US president Bill Clinton and former secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton at the summit yesterday.
Image: Kopano Tlape/ GCIS

President Cyril Ramaphosa says that for SA to have clean governance, a crop of credible leaders are needed at the helm of key government positions.

"As a country, South Africa is in great need of leadership, from people who have the commitment, vision, determination to confront the many challenges that we confront in this point in time," he said.

He was speaking at the Discovery Leadership Summit in Johannesburg yesterday.

The summit provides a global platform that brings together local and global leaders to share their strategies and insights on issues relating to business, economics, government and science. It also provides an opportunity for dialogue that contributes towards building a stronger SA and global society.

"None of these efforts to promote growth will succeed without leaders and it is precisely this point that we find ourselves at the economic crossroads, that we require courageous, committed, determined as well as visionary leadership throughout our society," Ramaphosa said.

The president warned those involved in corrupt activities - especially those occupying key positions - that he would crack the whip on them.

"Those who have been involved in corrupt activities must be dealt with without any fail and without any doubt because corruption is bad. However, [corruption] is not only in the public sector, it is also in the private sector. we must cleanse our country of all corrupt activities.

"It is usually leaders who are the ones who are at the forefront of perpetuating all these corrupt activities. It is for that reason that we say that we need leadership... that is not self-seeking."

Without mentioning former president Jacob Zuma by name, Ramaphosa said in the past nine years, business was sidelined, which made it hard for the private sector to invest in government.

"Clearly the investment strike is over, we are now getting South Africa to work."

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