Failed bid for 'dog sex rapist' to be evaluated

A lawyer representing Willem Kroukamp failed yesterday to convince the court that his client be referred for mental evaluation. /Thulani Mbele
A lawyer representing Willem Kroukamp failed yesterday to convince the court that his client be referred for mental evaluation. /Thulani Mbele

The lawyer representing the 45-year-old man accused of raping a domestic worker before forcing her to perform oral sex on his dogs yesterday failed to convince the Bronkhorstspruit Magistrate's Court that he should be referred for mental observation.

Magistrate Jacob Tsatsi agreed with the state that the defence had failed to demonstrate that the suspect had signs of mental illness, saying psychologist Dr Masase Bake had in fact testified that the accused had no signs of mental illness.

What was also striking, Tsatsi said, was that what the accused told the psychiatrist that he did sleep with the alleged victim as he normally did, was exactly what he told the investigating officer. He said the investigating officer interviewed the suspect and he answered perfectly and made a statement that was read into record, saying what was important was that the investigating officer did not detect any mental incapacity.

"Similarly. the doctor corroborated the investigating officer's statement that the accused understood everything as if he was talking to a normal person. This is a specialist, a person who deals with people with no proper minds. She knows what questions to ask," Tsatsi said.

He said the accused's father, the defence's only witness in the application for the suspect to be referred for mental evaluation, was unable to demonstrate that his son had a mental illness but that he was aggressive under the influence of alcohol.

Tsatsi said in actual fact the father wanted his son to be evaluated to establish what was wrong with him.

Earlier, the state slammed the defence's application as an attempt for the accused to evade justice, abuse the criminal justice system and delay the proceedings.

It also emerged in court that evidence before court was that the suspect stopped taking medication for mental illness in 2010, that he had a driver's licence and was once nabbed for driving under the influence of alcohol.

The suspect is yet to plead and the matter was postponed to March 13 for DNA results.

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