Zondo promises to get answers for SA

Judge Raymond Zondo says the commission of inquiry into state capture will investigate all issues relating to it thoroughly and properly.
Judge Raymond Zondo says the commission of inquiry into state capture will investigate all issues relating to it thoroughly and properly.
Image: SIMPHIWE NKWALI

Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo will not be intimidated or step back from investigating anyone implicated in state capture.

Under no illusion that there will be attempts by "certain individuals" to potentially sabotage the inquiry, Zondo was emphatic that nothing would stop him getting answers for the public.

"I will investigate anybody and everybody, no matter who he or she is. If they fall within the terms of reference they will be investigated," he said at a media briefing yesterday in Johannesburg.

"The commission will do its job properly. We owe this to the people of South Africa. I would not have taken this if I had any fear." He said the commission would, in its investigation, be guided by the evidence placed before it and all issues will be investigated thoroughly and properly.

With public concern growing over President Jacob Zuma's failure to announce the commission's terms of reference, Zondo was at pains to say that he was confident that they would soon be forthcoming.

Zondo, who declined to be drawn into whether he would launch a legal challenge or resign if he was unhappy over the terms of reference, said the allegations that needed to be investigated were of an "extremely serious nature".

"The allegations are so serious that they go to the very foundation of our constitution.

"These include that certain people, who had no constitutional powers, offered ministerial posts to certain individuals, that certain people influenced the composition of the boards of state-owned entities in such a way that looting can take place."

He was confident that former public protector Thuli Madonsela's report into state capture would play an important role in setting out the commission's terms of reference.

Zondo dismissed suggestions that he would not get support from the government.

"I have no doubt that I will get the support I need from all ministries and all forms of the government. I don't believe that there is anyone in government not wanting these allegations to be investigated."

He said while it would be legitimate for people to be concerned, once the terms of reference, along with the commission's regulations, were in place, it would start its work.

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