Mother-child marathons' coalition

Modiehi Lephuthing runs 21km while pushing her son Lehlohonolo during the Township Marathon in Eldorado Park. / SANDILE NDLOVU
Modiehi Lephuthing runs 21km while pushing her son Lehlohonolo during the Township Marathon in Eldorado Park. / SANDILE NDLOVU

Modiehi Lephuthing isn't an ordinary runner - her son is part of her half marathons as she completes races pushing him in a pram.

Lephuthing, 29, has so far collected 17 medals while pushing her son's pram.

Yesterday, Lephuthing, an electrical engineer from Centurion near Pretoria, told Sowetan she started running 10km and 21km half marathons with her son, Lehlohonolo, from the time he was four months old.

"We have both collected 17 medals. Every time we get to the finish line he also gets one," Lephuthing said.

It is an unusual sight to see a woman pushing a pram during a long-distance run, but Lephuthing said Lehlohonolo, who is now 15 months old, was popular with other runners.

"He is used to it now. When he sees other runners, he gets excited and he greets everyone along the way.

"He enjoys the ride and understands what we do. I always thank him at the end for being a good running partner," Lephuting said.

She makes the races fun by bringing along a loudspeaker so that they can play music along the way.

Lephuthing said she used to jog on her own after work before she fell pregnant, but only started running races after Lehlohonolo was born.

After his birth in October 2017, she still wanted to run in order to keep healthy, but getting a babysitter was a challenge.

"I just thought nothing could stop me. After surviving labour, anything is possible."

Lephuthing said she registered for her first 10km marathon during 2018 but the organisers were sceptical when she said she would be bringing a pram along.

"This other lady advised me to change to a 5km race. She said I would never make it because of the steeps," she said.

Lephuthing said they finished the race within less than an hour which won them gold medals.

Lephuthing has to stop every 8km during 21km races in case Lehlohonolo needs to be changed or fed.

This means that she has to make time for the stops during her training sessions to ensure that she finishes the race in time.

Lephuthing expects to run a 42km race next Sunday to qualify for the Two Oceans and Comrades marathons.

"If I qualify I am taking my son with me. I'm willing to take that risk," she said.

Lephuthing said she hoped to inspire other women.

Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments? Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

X