Assessment tests marred by 'chaos'

THE writing of Annual National Assessment (ANA) exams has been "chaotic" in some provinces due to poor administration, the National Professional Teachers' Organisation of South Africa says

"Principals are reporting that important teaching time has been lost unnecessarily due to the poor arrangements and administration by provinces," said president Ezrah Ramasehla.

Comment from the department could not be immediately obtained.

Schools had to collect the ANAs for the day from departmental offices and get children ready for the exam at 8.30am. In many cases, exam papers had not been ready.

In some cases, only half the papers were given to schools, Ramasehla claimed.

"This has resulted in some learners writing late and some earners not writing because of the unavailability of papers."

More than six million pupils across the country started writing ANAs on Tuesday, with Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga saying she was "expecting the worst".

They were aimed at seeing what skills, such as literacy and numeracy, pupils had and whether these, especially analytical skills, were at the correct level.

They would show how South Africa's children compare nationally and internationally. About 12 million pupils were expected to have written the ANAs by June. He said children had been unnecessarily intimidated by the exam atmosphere.

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