Thumbs up for World Cup courts

THE Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Development will consider making specialised courts a permanent feature following the success of World Cup courts.

THE Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Development will consider making specialised courts a permanent feature following the success of World Cup courts.

In just over three weeks, the 56 dedicated courts across the country have finalised 45 cases, with 39 of them resulting to convictions.

Department of Justice spokesperson Tlali Tlali said the possibility of importing these courts into the justice system would be explored after the tournament.

"Jeff Radebe has made a commitment that we will put heads together at the end of the tournament and interrogate with a critical eye this model that we have put in place in order to identify elements of success behind this recipe," he said.

Hundred-and-one cases have been heard by these courts since May 28, with the majority of accused being South African and 42 foreign nationals.

Offences varied from robbery, theft, possession of stolen goods, drugs and fraud. Tlali said there was a seven-point plan that was being phased into the system so that the situation was turned around.

"This plan is a basket of recommendations containing specific interventions of which aspects of it are being implemented," he said.

"Certain features of the current model used during the World Cup bear resemblance to some details contained in the seven-point plan."

The courts are open seven days a week, until 11pm and will continue operating for two weeks after the tournament.

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