IFP needs new blood

THE expulsion of IFP Youth Brigade national organiser Musa Zulu is an indication of the deep-seated problemsfacing the party.

THE expulsion of IFP Youth Brigade national organiser Musa Zulu is an indication of the deep-seated problemsfacing the party.

Zulu has been in the forefront of the call by the party's youth for a new leadership that will take the once strong Zulu nationalist party to another level.

The youth are calling for the replacement of the party's life president, Inkosi Mangosuthu Buthelezi, with the IFP's national chairperson Zanele Magwaza.

As a Young Turk in the party, Magwaza is seen as the leader who can infuse new life into the IFP.

This after the ANC gave the IFP a serious beating at the April polls. ANC presidential candidate Jacob Zuma had used the IFP's erstwhile political weapon - Zulu nationalism - to woo the voters in KwaZulu-Natal.

The IFP can argue that it is within its rights to expel any of its members who breaches its constitution.

The reality, however, is that by so doing it will only be treating the symptoms while failing to address the causes of the political malaise that has infected the party.

For it to rise to the level where it used to be both nationally and provincially, the IFP needs to inject new blood into its leadership.

It needs the kind of leadership that will be creative enough to reposition it as a modern democratic party not encumbered by traditional leadership ethics that are out of sync with the country's new political era - an era in which there is no room for parties driven by the "big man" syndrome.

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