Struggle hero Mashinini immortalised

TWENTY years after he died in exile, Tsietsi Mashinini was yesterday immortalised when a statue in his honour was unveiled at Morris Isaacson High School in Soweto.

TWENTY years after he died in exile, Tsietsi Mashinini was yesterday immortalised when a statue in his honour was unveiled at Morris Isaacson High School in Soweto.

Mashinini, who died in exile in Guinea in 1990, led Soweto students in a fight against Bantu education on June 16 1976.

Johannesburg executive mayor Amos Masondo said Mashinini's statue would help to remind generations after him to know the history of the country.

"We all have a responsibility to know where we come from. If we do, we will have a better understanding not only of the road that we have travelled thus far; we will indeed have a grasp of where we are today.

"Memories of the heroes and heroines of June 16 will remain embedded in our hearts and minds forever. June 16 will always be celebrated as the day which changed the course of history in South Africa," Masondo said.

Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane said it would never happen again in South Africa that people were killed for differing with government.

Mashinini's brother, Dee, thanked the government, but said more should be done to recognise Tsietsi and his comrades. "We greatly appreciate the government's effort to honour Tsietsi, but we want more - not only for Tsietsi but also for people who worked with him."

l In Kliptown, world-acclaimed poet Don Mattera praised the PAC for dedicating June 16 to honouring the party's late president Zephania Mothopeng.

Mattera also called on PAC supporters and South Africans in general to fight against xenophobia.

"Africa is for Africans. Let us preach peace among our people," he said.

Mattera, who suffers from cancer, said he joined the party because he wanted to be buried "the African way".

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