Youth do not appreciate the sacrifices made in 1976

YOUTH Day is not a big hoo ha anymore. Most of today's youth in Soweto do not know the inside of the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West.

YOUTH Day is not a big hoo ha anymore. Most of today's youth in Soweto do not know the inside of the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West.

The day that marks the liberation of South Africa has lost its impact on the youth. It used to be commemorated as a national holiday to celebrate and honour the class of 1976, who lost their lives while taking part in the struggle against apartheid and "Bantu education".

The youth has forgotten that if it was not for the class of 1976 black people would still have remained kitchen girls and garden boys. They would not have had the chance to receive education that would lead them to positions that makes them successful.

The country has now placed much of its focus on maths and science subjects, which may be the main cause for the turnout of today's uninformed youth.

Perhaps more focus should be placed on the importance of our country's history, and how we have evolved to what we are today.

Today's youth see Youth Day as an opportunity to relax at home and have fun.

The World Cup makes it even worse because a new page in the book of history is being written. The buzz around it makes the youth concentrate on the World Cup to the extent that they forget that it occurs in the same month that our country celebrates the fruits of the class of '76.

Our youth may be ready to face the challenges that come with freedom, but they do not know what that freedom means to the people who were in the frontline. All they know is that Hector Pieterson lost his life during the Soweto student uprising while protesting against "Bantu education".

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