Clothing life cycle generates potential environmental hazards

JUST like plastic and paper, fashion also leaves a pollution footprint. Each step of the clothing cycle generates potential environmental hazards.

JUST like plastic and paper, fashion also leaves a pollution footprint. Each step of the clothing cycle generates potential environmental hazards.

For example, polyester, the most widely used manufactured fibre, is made from petroleum.

With the rise in production in the fashion industry, demand for man-made fibres, especially polyester, has nearly doubled in the last 15 years.

The manufacture of polyester and other synthetic fabrics is an energy-intensive process requiring large amounts of crude oil and releasing emissions including acid gases such as hydrogen chloride, all of which can cause or aggravate respiratory disease.

British researchers have developed a wedding gown that can be dissolved in water to transform it into five new pieces.

This unconventional wedding dress is the result of an unlikely collaboration between fashion and engineering students.

One of the most iconic and symbolic garments in human history, the wedding gown also exemplifies the challenges of disposable clothing.

The vital ingredient in this fashion concoction is Polyvinyl alcohol, an odourless, nontoxic molecule that breaks down in water without harming the environment. - Keitumetse Segoai

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