Seed for pride in country sewn

The 2010 Fifa World Cup is a golden opportunity for South Africans to display their national pride, not only by getting behind Bafana Bafana, but also by knowing their national symbols.

The 2010 Fifa World Cup is a golden opportunity for South Africans to display their national pride, not only by getting behind Bafana Bafana, but also by knowing their national symbols.

The Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) are will run the campaign to expose the nation to the national symbols.

My 2010 School Adventure is in partnership with the Local Organising Committee and the departments of Basic Education and Sport and Recreation.

LOC chairperson Irvin Khoza said their aim was to make the global event appeal to every province and city across the country and the continent and they will use schools to achieve that.

The DAC is encouraging all South Africans to proudly display the national flag at their offices, homes, on their cars, anywhere that is suitable for the symbol to be placed.

"All of our symbols have a special meaning to the people of the South Africa and are a visible representation of our African heritage, and the diverse nature of our communities," said DAC deputy minister Paul Mashatile.

DAC will also be promoting and helping people identify with the national animal, the springbok, the national flower, the King Protea, the national tree, the Yellowwood, the national fish, the Galjoen, the national bird, the Blue Crane plus the National Coat of Arms.

Dudu Mazibuko, DAC 2010 project manager, said they want to educate the nation on the appropriate use of the symbols, including that the national flag must never touch the ground, never be used as a table-cloth, or cover a statue or plaque at unveiling ceremonies.

"The national anthem should always be sung standing, with hats or caps removed," Mazibuko said.

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