Man hangs himself after losing girlfriend

The South African Depression and Anxiety Group has warned that 75 percent of people who want to commit suicide tell someone before they actually kill themselves.

The South African Depression and Anxiety Group has warned that 75 percent of people who want to commit suicide tell someone before they actually kill themselves.

This was after the news that Vusumuzi Simphiwe Ntende, 28, from Ezikhaleni in Nseleni outside Empangeni, hanged himself at his home yesterday.

Ntende was found by his brother Ntuthuko after he hanged himself from the roof of the family's outbuilding.

Ntuthuko said his brother had left a note saying he killed himself because he could not accept that his girlfriend no longer loved him.

"My brother had a problem with his girlfriend. Late last year he had tried committing suicide by drinking acid," Ntuthuko said.

He said his brother showed no signs that he was about to take his life.

"When we were having supper he looked fine and went to bed being his normal self.

"We realised that he had killed himself when my mother took him his porridge for breakfast. She knocked but he did not open, so she asked me to check.

"He had locked himself in but I managed to open the door, only to find him hanging from a rope," sobbed Ntuthuko.

Police confirmed the incident.

SADAG spokesperson Cassey Amoore said suicide was the result of a combination of many factors.

Amoore warned that the signs of depression were always there.

"The behaviour changes." Amoore said. They start losing their appetite and changes in their sleep patterns become noticeable.

"They might also start giving away their most prized possessions because they feel they don't need it anymore.

"But most importantly they will tell someone what they are contemplating."

"It is important to confront them and to ask them why they want to end their lives and what they intend using to commit suicide. They must not be left alone."

People who suspect that their relatives, friends or neighbours are suicidal or notice their showing obvious signs of depression are urged to call 0800-567-567 or 0800-12-13-14.

X