Moral code debate is futile

PRESIDENT Jacob Zuma's proposal for a debate on the country's moral code is unworkable and will die a natural death just like the so-called moral regeneration project he once attempted to lead.

PRESIDENT Jacob Zuma's proposal for a debate on the country's moral code is unworkable and will die a natural death just like the so-called moral regeneration project he once attempted to lead.

For the moral code debate to conclude with a national consensus, there would first have to be points of reference that are commonly agreed on, an impossibility in a country that has diverse religions, ethnicity and cultures.

Some religions for instance allow the consumption of alcohol and the practice of polygamy, while others abhor both with a passion.

All religions refer to different scriptures, the Bible, the Koran, book of Mormons, doctrines etc, and given the culture of arrogance and self-righteousness that prevails in the area of religion, the idea of an agreed point of reference is a stillborn.

Although he denies it, it is clear that Zuma is still sore about the country's uproar over his fathering a love child. He feels that he is being prosecuted for practising "his culture", as he is known to say when he defends his polygamous relationships, hence his need for the moral code debate.

South Africa is a religion dominated country and even though religions (dominated by Christians) differ in their approach to different matters, they are all in agreement that adultery is a sin. Zuma will find no friends or vindication of his behaviour in the majority.

It would be proper though for the president of the country to direct his energy to the very important issues that he has been loudly silent about, such as the mudslinging that is going on in the ANC-led tripartite alliance, the jostling to get their snouts in the feeding trough of the fat cats in the ruling party that is fuelling corruption to unprecedented levels, worsening the plight of the poor masses.

Don Shongwe,

Windsor East

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