Taiwan in bid to make world a better place

THE western Indian city of Pune was the scene of a deadly terror attack earlier this month. Nine people were killed and 57 injured when a bomb exploded in a crowded bakery frequented by students and foreigners.

THE western Indian city of Pune was the scene of a deadly terror attack earlier this month. Nine people were killed and 57 injured when a bomb exploded in a crowded bakery frequented by students and foreigners.

Though the blast was the worst terror attack on Indian soil since the 2008 Mumbai massacre, something positive has emerged from the tragic turn of events.

Jack Huong, a 48-year-old unemployed man, made the long journey from Taiwan to India for peaceful meditation at Pune's world famous Osho Ashram, but ended up a local hero after saving the lives of two Indian friends.

Huong and his friends were in the bakery when the bomb exploded. The force of the blast was so powerful that it threw Huong on to the road outside. But on seeing his friends groaning in pain he rushed back into the burning bakery to rescue them.

He sustained severe burns in the process and is now recovering in hospital.

Huong is not only a brave hero, his attitude of forgiveness in the wake of the event is also exemplary. Asked in a television interview about his feelings towards the terrorists Huong said: "I have no hatred against those people . love is the only thing that helps sort out differences."

Like brave Huong the entire island nation of Taiwan would like to save lives and make the world a better place.

Despite its diplomatic isolation, Taiwan has won the respect of the international community through its humanitarian aid and assistance to developing countries.

Ongoing reconstruction efforts in Haiti are a poignant example of efforts undertaken in the spirit of global community on behalf of Taiwan and all her people.

Greg Lishman,

Bryanston

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