HOTEL WORKERS END SEVEN-WEEK STRIKE

THE seven-week-long strike at Sun International hotels is over after an agreement was reached yesterday between the employer and South African Commercial, Catering and Allied Workers Union.

THE seven-week-long strike at Sun International hotels is over after an agreement was reached yesterday between the employer and South African Commercial, Catering and Allied Workers Union.

The parties agreed to an 8,75percent increase across the board, followed by a 7,75percent increase next year.

Saccawu spokesperson Amos Mothapo said the union had initially demanded a 13percent increase.

"We later decreased it to nine percent. We are happy with the agreement, though there are several other issues that need to be resolved in the long term," Mothapo said.

Joe Rakole, who has been working as a supervisor at a restaurant in Sun City for the past 16 years, went without his R3000 monthly salary since the strike started on December 4.

The new increase means he will get an additional R270 on his pay cheque next month.

Mothapo said the increase would be backdated to July 1 last year.

"It is better than nothing, but we were expecting the company to recognise Sundays and public holidays as overtime work," Rakole said.

The agreement includes a home ownership scheme that was increased from R100000 to R135000 for workers who have been permanently employed for at least two years.

Mothapo said the education scheme was also extended across the board, and that there was an improvement on the transport allowance.

Saccawu had also demanded that Sun International terminate its contract with Falcon Security.

Mothapo said the union realised that their members would lose jobs if Falcon were to go.

"The Falcon issue requires the input of all stakeholders, including the South African Transport and Allied Workers Union, whose members work for Falcon.

"If Falcon goes, what will happen to the workers?" Mothapo asked.

He said the banning of labour brokers had to be discussed with the Department of Labour, and that this was "going to be a long process".

Sun International spokesperson Enid Vickers said operations had continued throughout the strike with "limited disruption".

Vickers said: "There was no significant loss of business that we could measure because of the strike."

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