Reggae is alive and doing well

WITH his album Ndi Do Fa Na Inwi, Reggae star Tshidino Ndou says he wants to prove that reggae music is not dead.

WITH his album Ndi Do Fa Na Inwi, Reggae star Tshidino Ndou says he wants to prove that reggae music is not dead.

Ndou, of Venda in Limpopo, believes that reggae deserves a chance, like any other genre. Ndi Do Fa Na Inwi is not a serious, hard-core reggae album. He has fused reggae with disco and came up with a vibey sound.

"Reggae still has a following, especially in Limpopo. Here, people still take this genre seriously. My album has received a positive response and I am sure it will sell well. The king of local reggae Lucky Dube might be dead, but the genre is still very much alive," Ndou says.

Though reggae is not big in the rest of the country, Ndou is optimistic.

"Before I did the album, I did my research and realised that people love reggae and gospel. I know many might think I am crazy, but I did this album because I know there is a market for it. Not everyone likes to listen to kwaito or house music."

He says his album talks about love and other relationship issues. He says what he likes about reggae is that its a vibey sound makes people want to get up and dance.

Ndou, who is also a filmmaker, says he is passionate about all entertainment. He says he started in community theatre, where he spent many years discovering new talent. He got tired of theatre industry because it does not pay well and focused his attention on film.

He has produced a number of films. His filmMathayithayi was aired on Soweto Television. Ndou is currently casting actors for his new film Shedo Li a Vhulaisa.

He says he uses his music as sound tracks in his films.

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