Lessons from the Eskom fiasko

HAD the Eskom fiasco been a boxing match one would have said that Jacob Maroga, while being on the ropes, had miraculously knocked Bobby Godsell out.

HAD the Eskom fiasco been a boxing match one would have said that Jacob Maroga, while being on the ropes, had miraculously knocked Bobby Godsell out.

But this would be a crude description that does not assist in cleaning the mess at our power utility.

While the latest saga has undoubtedly caused immeasurable harm to Eskom's reputation, it has fortunately also begun to shed some light on the dark corners that were otherwise hidden from us.

Several lessons have to be learnt on how to or how not to run state-owned enterprises and the oversight role that must be played by shareholders.

The importance of these entities in driving transformation cannot be overemphasised.

As critical instruments that drive sustainable development, SOE's need to ensure that their strategic visions are aligned with the broader national agenda.

Any incongruence will invariably lead to bickering and non-attainment of national goals.

In finding solutions going forward, it is paramount that an examination of the legislative and regulatory frameworks be undertaken.

This exercise will assist in ensuring that there is respect and compliance to corporate governance rules.

This will also define the rules of engagement between all stakeholders so as the oversight role played by the shareholder is not misinterpreted as "political interference".

Mogomotsi Mogodiri, Johannesburg

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