My Isuzu is consuminga lot of oil

I AM a woman who drives a 1999 model Isuzu KB 280 DT. Recently the vehicle underwent an engine overhaul, but since then I have noticed that its oil consumption has changed. Previously I only topped up the oil close to the oil change intervals or during the routine services, but since it was overhauled its oil consumption has increased. Every now and then I have to top up with a pint or two. What is strange is that there appears to be no leak from the engine - I have checked the engine and not a single drop of leaking oil can be found. What could be the problem?

I AM a woman who drives a 1999 model Isuzu KB 280 DT. Recently the vehicle underwent an engine overhaul, but since then I have noticed that its oil consumption has changed. Previously I only topped up the oil close to the oil change intervals or during the routine services, but since it was overhauled its oil consumption has increased. Every now and then I have to top up with a pint or two. What is strange is that there appears to be no leak from the engine - I have checked the engine and not a single drop of leaking oil can be found. What could be the problem?

Nyiko Mathebula

Midrand

NYIKO, if there's no oil leak, it can only mean that oil is getting into the combustion chambers and is burned there together with the air/fuel mixture.

The oil can either get past the oil control rings on the pistons, or it can find its way past the valve stem oil seals, seeping down between the inlet valve stems and the valve guides into the combustion chambers.

Whatever was done during the overhaul (presumably new rings were fitted, and possibly work was done on the cylinder bores and valves), it would be virtually impossible for the average engineering shop to work to the same accuracy that is maintained in the factory.

Therefore, it's not uncommon for an overhauled engine to use more oil than a new one, even if there was no flagrant bad workmanship during the overhaul.

It is possible that the oil consumption will decrease during the first 5000km and thereafter stay constant for years, following a pattern sometimes seen in new vehicles.

If it doesn't happen on your Isuzu, and you find the oil consumption unacceptable, I suggest you get an independent expert (perhaps at an AA technical centre) to get to the root of the problem, and then review your options.

I recently bought a car from a business in Pretoria, and I thought that paying cash would make it easy for me to get it registered in my name. To my surprise this guy said that I need to take it and register it on my own. I don't know how to go about changing the ownership of the car. Please help me with this one.

Anonymous

MANY used car dealers do indeed take care of the whole process of changing the ownership of a vehicle, as a courtesy to the buyer but they are not obliged to do so.

The business where you bought the car has to provide you with the following:

l An official invoice stating that you have bought the car, from whom and on which date;

l The registration certificate of the car, showing that it is registered in the name of the seller mentioned on the invoice (and if you bought from a private seller with the dealer only acting as a go-between, you also need a certified copy of the seller's ID).

These documents you have to take (within 21 days from date of sale) to the traffic department together with

l A valid roadworthy certificate for the car;

l A certified copy of your own ID.

At the licensing offices you have to fill in an application form for the Registration and Licensing of a Vehicle (an RLV form, commonly known as the "blue form").

Then you hand over the whole caboodle and receive a new registration certificate, now in your name, which should be kept for the day when you want to sell the car. Naturally, the registering authority charges you a fee for this rigmarole.

I hope the seller supplied a roadworthy certificate for the car, because getting that is a mission in itself.

I also hope that the various checks to ensure it is not a stolen vehicle have been scrupulously done.

If you have the slightest doubt about this point, I suggest you fill in an RPC form (Request for Police Clearance) and take the car for police scrutinising. It will probably take a day but it may save you untold grief.

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