Shot in the arm for people living with HIV-Aids

TIMELY DONATION: Posing with the R100000 cheque to the Waterberg Welfare Society yesterday, are, from left, July Letsebe (Waterberg Welfare Society), Christina Ramasodi (society), Joe Dlamini (Vodacom), Zacharia Sekhu (society), Lucas Nhlapo (mayor), Eric Gwangwa (Waterberg mayor) and Steven Lukhwa (Vodacom). Pic: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. 15/10/2009. © Sowetan.
TIMELY DONATION: Posing with the R100000 cheque to the Waterberg Welfare Society yesterday, are, from left, July Letsebe (Waterberg Welfare Society), Christina Ramasodi (society), Joe Dlamini (Vodacom), Zacharia Sekhu (society), Lucas Nhlapo (mayor), Eric Gwangwa (Waterberg mayor) and Steven Lukhwa (Vodacom). Pic: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. 15/10/2009. © Sowetan.

VODACOM yesterday changed the lives of people living with HIV and Aids in Limpopo by donating R100000 towards uplifting their lives.

The money was donated to a charity organisation based in Vaalwater in the Waterberg of Limpopo.

The donation comes after the Waterberg district municipality (WDM) chose the Waterberg Welfare Society (WWS) as its beneficiary.

Through the Vodacom Foundation the company has helped many orphans and adults infected and affected by the disease.

Speaking during the handing over of the cheque in Polokwane yesterday, Vodacom managing executive Joe Dlamini said the donation was part of their celebrations of the foundation's 10 years of existence.

He said the Vodacom Foundation was established in 1999 as the main vehicle for coordinating Vodacom's corporate social investments.

"The foundation's focus is to enhance the quality of life of vulnerable people, with special emphasis on the application of information and communication technology to address challenges in education, health and security," said Dlamini.

WDM executive mayor Eric Gwangwa, who accepted the money on behalf of the WWS, urged members of the organisation to use the money "for a good cause".

WWS is a registered non-profit organisation founded by concerned community members in 2000, primarily to provide help and support to people infected and affected by the HIV-Aids pandemic.

July Letsebe, who is among people living with the disease, and who also works for the organisation, said he was hopeful the lives of people living with the disease would change for the better.

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