This is the death of a nation

THE confusion about the appointment of the Transnet chief executiveepitomises the extent to which rot that has become the order of the day in the government and its parastatals.

THE confusion about the appointment of the Transnet chief executiveepitomises the extent to which rot that has become the order of the day in the government and its parastatals.

One of the prospective incumbents, Siyabonga Gama, cannot contend to take the top position since he is entangled in a disciplinary hearing about tenders that is delaying the appointment process.

The delay is unfortunately necessary since it would be unfair to exclude Gama from the incumbent list before the conclusion of the hearing going on in the high court.

What are very worrying, though, are the noises and whining of government officials who seek to subvert the law with insinuations aimed at pre-empting investigations into Gama's conduct.

One cannot help but feel a deep sadness when ministers that the electorate has entrusted with upholding our democracy are meddling in law processes with vitriolic and unsolicited opinions.

Lying deep at the root of this meddling is the despicable need to place cronies in influential positions in government and its parastatals for the purposes of self-enrichment.

This tendency is a cancer that President Jacob Zuma must stop in the ruling party if it has to retain at least a modicum of integrity.

Disappointing to the core is the involvement of some seasoned cadres of the struggle who have abandoned their moral uprightness and are now paying homage to the pagan gods of crass materialism.

In theirshoving to get their greedy snouts into the trough these cadres no longer have the interest of the poor at heart. In the language of isiZulu they say: "Lafa elihle kakhulu" (This is the death of a nation).

Don Shongwe, Windsor East

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