Lived his life

FOR a man born with albinism, socialite Tony Ngwenya seized life with a burst of energy and an extroverted demeanour untouched by the self-consciousness that usually characterises his kind.

FOR a man born with albinism, socialite Tony Ngwenya seized life with a burst of energy and an extroverted demeanour untouched by the self-consciousness that usually characterises his kind.

In fact, his attitude towards the condition was as much impervious as it was a spot of bother for other people preoccupied with superstitions and taboos about albinism.

Though he would sometimes be self-deprecating about it, much to the uneasiness of people with normal pigmentation, Ngwenya was not oblivious of the limiting challenges faced by albinos, many whom were condemned to a reclusive life.

In the 1990s, he started the Albinism Society together with his albino sister, Nomasonto Mazibuko. Their mission was to help others battling with the condition in solitude.

Ngwenya, who died on Tuesday, leaves a legacy which has changed as much the lives of those living with albinism as it has shaped the attitudes of the society towards them.

Lala Kahle Mtimande.

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