IAAF urges Chuene not to quit

ATHLETICS South Africa president Leonard Chuene says he's humbled to hear that the IAAF would still like him to serve in its structures.

ATHLETICS South Africa president Leonard Chuene says he's humbled to hear that the IAAF would still like him to serve in its structures.

The International Association of Athletics Federations, through its president Lamine Diack, wrote to President Jacob Zuma last month asking him to help find a solution to the situation that arose from the Caster Semenya gender controversy.

He wrote: "As a son of Africa, fully aware of the positive role that can be played by Chuene not only in favour of this country, but for the continent in general, I have taken it upon me to refuse to register his resignation, as its consequences would be to the detriment of our youths."

Chuene said: "It's a good feeling to know that my work is still appreciated, but I had to resign. Even when I resigned, the IAAF refused to accept my resignation, saying my departure would weaken the organisation, but I had to leave.

"One of my athletes was being vilified and as the president of ASA, I had to come to her aid. I could not do that while working for the IAAF."

Chuene said Zuma has not yet approached him, adding that the Semenya gender debacle was unfortunate.

"We knew that she was a girl. She has been running from a young age as a girl, her passport and birth certificate indicate that she is a girl, even her parents say she is a girl, so we have no reason to doubt her gender.

"It is really unfortunate that instead of celebrating this girl's triumph, we have to discuss her gender."

Meanwhile, ASA High Performance Coordinator Wilfred Daniels resigned citing "lack of support" for Semenya. Isaac Skweyiya, general manager of Athletics Central North West, said he was taken aback by Daniels's remarks.

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