Deadly acts on our roads

WE WONDER what it will take for the message that speed kills to be heeded. As it is South African roads are a dangerous place to be. Each year, well over 10000 people lose their lives on the road.

WE WONDER what it will take for the message that speed kills to be heeded. As it is South African roads are a dangerous place to be. Each year, well over 10000 people lose their lives on the road.

Just last week, AmaZulu football player Jan Sillo lost his life in a car crash.

This did not deter Orlando Pirates player Gert Schalkwyk from driving at almost 200kmh.

We are not making the assumption that Sillo was reckless.

To do so without full knowledge of how the crash happened and cost him his life would be improper and insensitive to his loved ones.

But one would have assumed that for someone like Schalkwyk, the latest road tragedy to claim a footballer's life would be a reminder that you cannot simply dribble your way past the rules of the road.

Schalkwyk was already an adult when the likes of Lesley Manyathela and Gift Leremi died in car crashes. He probably played with and against both at some point.

Driving as though one owns the road is not limited to footballers and other socialites.

There is an unfortunate South African culture that prefers to treat being a road hog as a minor infraction rather than a potentially deadly act for the driver and other road users.

It is time for the law enforcers to demonstrate that they will not tolerate the actions of those who endanger lives of others on our roads.

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