initiates Run AMOK

CONCERNED residents of Thakgalang village inSekgosese, Limpopo, have accused the operators of a local initiation school of making their lives a living hell.

CONCERNED residents of Thakgalang village inSekgosese, Limpopo, have accused the operators of a local initiation school of making their lives a living hell.

This after the local traditional authority introduced ground rules to be followed by villagers during the initiation period.

The rules prohibit residents from doing some of their day-to-day activities.

The residents said among the rules introduced was the banning of playing of music, singing in churches and other traditional celebrations.

They are also prohibited from holding tribal gatherings or kgoro until the initiates have graduated this weekend.

A concerned resident, who asked not to be named, said a group of young men from a local initiation school roamed the streets of the village at night and visited households unannounced to check whether people were adhering to the rules.

He said they sometimes assaulted those who were found playing music or walking the streets at night.

"Members of the community found to be ignoring the rules are also subjected to fines of not less than R150," said the resident.

The villagers claimed that the people who applied the rules were mostly teenage boys who "did not even show respect for the elderly".

They said they had informed local chiefs about the conduct of the initiates but they would not listen to their concerns.

The residents said there were two initiation schools at Sekgosese, under Chief Mamaila and Kgoshi Pheeha.

Most of the villagers told Sowetan that they felt as if they were living a life of hell since the initiation schools started more than two weeks ago.

Chief Makhudu Pheeha, uner whom the Thakgalang area falls, said the ground rules were introduced a long time ago.

"Anybody who is an African should understand that. It has been part of the culture here," said Pheeha.

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