Mayisela hunts crown denied his dad Arthur back in 1986

STEVE Mayisela hopes to collect the crown many believe his legendary father, Arthur "Fighting Prince" Mayisela, was robbed of decades ago.

STEVE Mayisela hopes to collect the crown many believe his legendary father, Arthur "Fighting Prince" Mayisela, was robbed of decades ago.

Mayisela manages the brash Boitshepo Mandawe, who challenges champion Chris "The Heat" van Heerden for the SA welterweight title on Friday night.

Arthur Mayisela never took a step backwards in his rousing challenge against then champion Harold "The Hammer" Volbrecht on June 14, 1986. The fight was controversially declared a technical draw after Volbrecht suffered a cut above the eye, with many at the ringside believing that Mayisela was about to end his long reign.

Like the Mayiselas, Mandawe is from Meadowlands in Soweto. The up-and-coming prospect warned this week that Van Heerden won't last the distance against him. His manager is equally confident.

"Punishment is what is in store for him (Van Heerden). He is taking chances by defending against me. I will shake his hand if he will still be on his feet after seven rounds. That is how hard I will fight," said Mandawe, who has inherited the nickname "Fighting Prince".

The fight will be staged by Knockout Promotions at Dr Malan School in Meyerton, which is in Van Heerden's backyard.

"I have no respect for Chris as a fighter. He must earn it by beating me up, but that won't happen. Instead I will beat him, give the title back to him, fight him again and still beat him," said motormouth Mandawe, who boasts 10 wins, eight by knockout .

Trainer Jerry Phukuje said Meadowlands badly wanted to have its own national champion again.

"We had Jerry Mbitse, Arthur Mayisela, Bushy Mosoeu, Abram Gumede, David Potsane and Jake Matlala, all from Meadowlands, as champions. I will produce one on Friday," said the unheralded mentor who guided William Gare to the SA super middleweight strap.

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