please leave our vuvuzela alone

HANDS off the vuvuzela! I heard myself screaming while listening to a self-righteous man calling for the banning of the plastic horn blown by South African football fans in the stands.

HANDS off the vuvuzela! I heard myself screaming while listening to a self-righteous man calling for the banning of the plastic horn blown by South African football fans in the stands.

This condescending person called a radio talk show to make this ridiculous demand.

My blood boiled when I heard more people reaffirming the call, saying the vuvuzela is for hooligans.

Excuse me! If you want to see hooligans at football games I will gladly buy you a ticket to Europe. That continent has produced them in abundance.

I was ready to pull out my hair when, as a solution, another caller suggested we have vuvuzela-free zones at stadiums so that those who want to enjoy the game can do so without the loud blast of this "offensive instrument".

The radio discussion was about the low turnout at soccer matches. This genius who called the programme insisted the vuvuzela is too loud and that is why he and many others do not go to matches.

People like him should be arrested for being, well, anal. We could also add a charge of stupidity because you would really have to be an idiot to expect peace and quiet at the stadium. You don't go to the stadium to meditate.

The vuvuzela is meant to be loud, it is made to create a deafening noise and electrify the atmosphere. From what I have seen on television during matches, this instrument is loved by many and has almost become a tradition.

Watching fanatical supporters tirelessly cheering their teams on, working up a frenzy and blowing whistles and all manner of instruments, I can't help marvelling at their ability to have fun.

Grown men and women, their painted faces, huge colourful "sunglasses", placards predicting the demise of their opponents, chanting war cries - it really is a sight to behold.

There must be some psychology to this. Why does the public expression of emotion evoke such discomfort?

I am sure we all know people who get hot and bothered at the mere sight of happy people. Is it envy at the ability of others to exclaim their joy through laughing, screaming, crying, shouting, whistling and blowing the vuvuzela?

I have often seen people with their noses in the air, expressing disgust at the loudness around them. These boring whingers have something against being carefree and joyous. At all times there must be decorum and order. Oh please, give us a break!

The same applies to Fifa. What possessed them to have a rule limiting national anthems to 90 seconds? Is it really an affront to the game and the tournament if a national anthem is longer?

By creating these stringent rules and restrictions they are interfering with the theatre of the moment. National anthems heighten emotions and fill our hearts with pride.

While the fire of patriotism seeps through our veins as we raise our voices in unison, why should someone be doing a time check and shouting "TIME UP?" Come on Fifa, don't rain on our parade!

Business Day correctly asked "does Fifa really need to be such a control freak?"

At the rate they are going, I would not be surprised if they made an announcement banning the use of the vuvuzela at next year's World Cup.

You cannot contain the outpouring of positive emotions.

Let people be spontaneous and exuberant. Life is difficult enough.

Give us a break, or get lost.

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