Strikers hold SA to ransom

Though sometimes I understand South Africa's working class and poor taking to the streets to protest against exploitation and poor service delivery, I find it appalling when people abuse this right because they feel they are entitled to strike.

Though sometimes I understand South Africa's working class and poor taking to the streets to protest against exploitation and poor service delivery, I find it appalling when people abuse this right because they feel they are entitled to strike.

Taxi drivers think they are entitled to do whatever, and however, they please.

The BRT system has been put on hold not because it is a bad programme or because it will take bread off the table of taxi operators, but because some taxi operators refuse to take part in BRT.

The people who are building stadiums, particularly in Mbombela, have held the country to ransom by going on strike at every critical stage of construction. This has delayed the stadium programme for long periods.

The people of Khutsong have now been reintegrated into Gauteng, but are again threatening to disrupt schooling for some other reason. Will they ever be satisfied?

Bafana Bafana, again at the last minute before the Confederations Cup, made close to impossible demands. This is totally unacceptable.

It's time for each sector of our society to ask themselves what it is that they can do for the country instead of perpetually holding the country to ransom because they feel they are entitled to.

The unions and employers need to learn to negotiate to avoid costly strikes. If they don't, strikes will not be effective, but will result in time-wasting picketing. So let us only toyi-toyi when we have exhausted all other avenues and when it is necessary, not for the fun of it.

Citizens are the ones who pay the price in the end.

This culture of entitlement needs to stop.

Makhiwesizwe Andrew Motha , Sunnyside

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