Fifa kicks out Pharaohs penalty protest

FIFA yesterday dismissed a complaint by Egypt were angered by referee Howard Webb awarding Brazil a penalty in their drama-filled opening match in Mangaung on Monday.

FIFA yesterday dismissed a complaint by Egypt were angered by referee Howard Webb awarding Brazil a penalty in their drama-filled opening match in Mangaung on Monday.

The Pharaohs insisted that Webb erred in awarding Brazil a last minute penalty which was converted by Kaka. The South Americans won the match 4-3.

After initially a corner kick when Ahmed El-Mohamadi handled in an attempt to clear the ball, the Englishman later changed his mind after being alerted by one of his assistants, Mike Mullarkey, that it was a handball.

"While not disputing the correctness of the referee's decision to award a penalty in favour of Brazil and show the Egyptian player Ahmed El-Mohamadi the red card, the Egyptian FA questioned the manner in which the referee (Webb) came to his decision," said Fifa in a statement.

"Fifa analysed the decision by going through all the evidence at its disposal, including the referee's match report, as well as the additional statement that Webb provided at Fifa's request.

"A thorough analysis of the aforementioned documents revealed that the decision in question was achieved through teamwork between the match referee and his assistant referee number one, Mike Mullarkey, who confirmed the offence to the referee from his clear viewing angle."

Mohamadi was also sent off for the handball.

Dunga blamed his side's lackadaisical to fatigue.

"We did not perform to the expectations today because the players are tired after playing tough World Cup qualifiers. We also travelled a long distance to here."

Brazilian Inter Milan goalkeeper Julio Cesar admitted that they lost a bit of concentration in the second half.

Egypt, however, started the second stanza with a bang, scoring two quick goals through Mohamed Shwanky and Zidan in the 54th and 55th minutes to level the matters, until Kaka penalty broke their hearts and left them wild-eyed with the late strike.

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