young tycoon is still broke

THREE months after a curator was appointed, the process to deliver a better life for a 19-year-old boy paralysed after being knocked by a car has started.

THREE months after a curator was appointed, the process to deliver a better life for a 19-year-old boy paralysed after being knocked by a car has started.

Phumzile Lamula's son, Sibusiso, was run down by a car 12 years ago, leaving him paralysed and mentally disabled. He was seven at the time and in Grade 2.

Lamula approached Raphael and David Smith Attorneys to help her claim from the Road Accident Fund.

In 2006, the RAF paid out R1,2million in compensation, of which R875000 was deposited into the attorneys' trust account but Lamula has not received a cent since then.

Lamula still lives in an RDP house in Lehae, near Lenasia, and depends on Sibusiso's disability grant for their livelihood.

Three months ago, Judge Nigel Willis appointed a curator, Advocate Michael Fisher, to oversee Sibusiso's trust fund.

This came after a series of stories by Sowetan about the law firm's reluctance to release the money.

Fisher confirmed that the process was now under way, with the first meeting having been held on May 22. He said they had set up appointments several times but his fear of going to Soweto has slowed things down.

Last month, Lamula's cousin, Nathi, offered to accompany him and help with interpretation.

"Yes, I said I couldn't go to Phumzile's place alone, hence she organised someone to fetch me," said Fisher.

"I had a lengthy session with Phumzile and even brought them to my home so that she understands what is expected of me and how the whole process would unfold." He said the next stage in the process was to set up Sibusiso's trust fund and compile his report which he will then submit to the judge.

"I have had extensive interviews with the lawyers, and Lamula and both parties have been cooperative," he said.

"By the end of next week I should be done with my report, which includes recommendations of what could be done with the money to help Sibusiso," said Fisher.

Despite the delays, Lamula said she was happy with the progress.

"I never thought it would take such a long time, but I'm happy with the way the curator has been treating me and my son," Lamula said yesterday.

X