Call for legislation to protect people with HIV from being singled out

While SADC countries have made progress in addressing some aspects of HIV-Aids and human rights laws, most countries are selectively applying international guidelines on HIV-Aids and human rights.

While SADC countries have made progress in addressing some aspects of HIV-Aids and human rights laws, most countries are selectively applying international guidelines on HIV-Aids and human rights.

This is according to a report published recently by Aids and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa.

The report describes the extent to which SADC countries have implemented the International Guidelines on HIV-Aids and Human Rights.

The guidelines declare that availability and accessibility of treatment, protecting people with HIV from unfair discrimination and creating supportive structures for groups vulnerable to HIV-Aids are some of the fundamental human rights issues relating to HIV-Aids.

SADC countries have made progress in the provision of HIV treatment with a million more people having been put on treatment in 2007. However, only 14percent of SADC countries are reaching 70percent of those in need of treatment. Stumbling blocks include lack of facilities, laws prohibiting children from accessing treatment without parental involvement and lack of healthcare workers.

In the report, the Aids alliance calls for laws to protect HIV-positive people from discrimination. - Health-e news www.sadc-reep.org.za

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