ANC goes bling in effort to attract hip, happening youth

VOTE OF CONFIDENCE: Dr Obakeng Makeleng of the health department with ANC supporters, among them Zandile Nzalo to his right. 19/04/09. © Unknown.
VOTE OF CONFIDENCE: Dr Obakeng Makeleng of the health department with ANC supporters, among them Zandile Nzalo to his right. 19/04/09. © Unknown.

Bright green and gold glitter sparkled on tight-fitted T-shirts worn by "ANC Babes" as the party stepped up its youth appeal in its 2009 election campaign.

Bright green and gold glitter sparkled on tight-fitted T-shirts worn by "ANC Babes" as the party stepped up its youth appeal in its 2009 election campaign.

"It's all about the bling," said Marilyn Majane, with the words, "ANC Babe" emblazoned on her tight-fitting, bare-midriffed T-shirt as she showed her support at the Coca-Cola Park stadium in Johannesburg yesterday.

"It's much sexier," said Sonya Motaung, dressed in shorts and a T-shirt which read: "Young, Gifted and ANC."

ANC national executive committee member Nomvula Mokonyane on Friday said the party had attempted to appeal to the youth in its 2009 campaign.

"It added flair and excitement to the campaign," she said.

Ntabiseng Ngwane, a supporter sporting large Gucci sunglasses and a tight-fighting black T-shirt which read: "Fact. ANC ROCKS," said the party was targeting the "hip and happening" youth with their new T-shirts and paraphernalia.

"They went all out in terms of the bling bling," she said.

Tebogo Kukama, brandishing his T-shirt with the words "Vote ANC" printed in glitter and gold, said: "They have to appeal to the youth, they revamped their strategy because they know the youth are the future."

Petuni Chadi said the party was "moving with the times".

"They have to capture the attention of the youth and get them involved," she said, posing for a camera in another "ANC Babes" T-shirt.

Her friend Lindiwe had modified the already trendy T-shirt by chopping off the sleeves and shortening it even further, making her pierced belly button clearly visible.

Amidst the swarm of young people at the adjoining Johannesburg Stadium was 71-year-old Michael Tuge, carefully making his way into the stadium. He walked with the aid of a stick as he made his way to the stands where there was singing, dancing and vuvuzela-blowing by ANC supporters.

"I have to be here," he said. "This is my organisation, my family," he said from underneath an ANC cap.

He said that he would leave the dancing and singing to the youth but was determined to hear ANC leader Jacob Zuma speak. - Sapa

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