Act against unfair journos

Charles Mogale's piece, "Fantasising overly needs a cure" on February 11, was of little substance. It was of dull and of no national interest.

Charles Mogale's piece, "Fantasising overly needs a cure" on February 11, was of little substance. It was of dull and of no national interest.

It offered nothing objective, except to try to spin the shabby work of editors who stooped very low with fictitious and unwarranted allegations into President Kgalema Motlanthe's private life.

Mogale did not explain what motivated his newspaper to report unverified allegations, fraught with libel and unprofessionalism, to damage Motlanthe's good name.

He simply claims: "I remembered Josh this past week as the newspaper I work for (Sunday World) got to the crux of the story of the woman who clearly fantasises about being our first lady."

He indirectly admits to have been susceptible to hoaxes, lies and lies. This compromises journalistic ethics.

At the heart of these ethics is critical and investigative journalism.

It means that journalists cannot consciously abuse their power and then act innocently and seek legal advice after violating a citizen's right to privacy and human dignity.

The press ombudsman and the South African National Editors Forum should act against those who overstep the mark. Otherwise, this loophole will give ammunition to sinister forces to exploit and champion their own agenda in the name of press freedom.

Morgan Phaahla, Vosloorus

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