Give vendors a chance to make a living

At the beginning of this week I was saddened by the sight of stocks of cooked maize being confiscated by Tshwane Metro officials from vendors selling it to people in the city centre.

At the beginning of this week I was saddened by the sight of stocks of cooked maize being confiscated by Tshwane Metro officials from vendors selling it to people in the city centre.

The reason cited was that the vendors did not have licences or permits to sell in town.

Though a law-abiding citizen I want to argue that while I understand that these laws are there to keep a certain level of order, they are also restrictive.

The people selling mealies on the streets are doing their bit to fight poverty. Taking away their stocks is tantamount to taking away their hard-earned bread.

In a thinking, functioning and a sensitive legal system, which we as a developmental state should have, I would expect a permit system that enables vendors to keep their stocks and to provide them with free temporary permits .

To see the tears of an ageing mother who cannot contest these confiscations and who does not have enough money to release the confiscated goods is truly painful.

The women, young boys and girls selling mealies are suddenly robbed of their goods and turned into criminals. So I want to beg the powers that be to think clearly before enforcing some of these laws.

Finally, I would like to remind all government departments that our most fundamental principle as a country is that of Batho Pele.

Makhiwesizwe Andrew Motha, Sunnyside

X