Nip racism in the cradle

It is a fact that the dawn of democracy in 1994 was a process, but not a solution to racial prejudices suffered by blacks for more than 350 years. The prejudices that were enforced by law by the apartheid government are now engraved in the minds of people.

It is a fact that the dawn of democracy in 1994 was a process, but not a solution to racial prejudices suffered by blacks for more than 350 years. The prejudices that were enforced by law by the apartheid government are now engraved in the minds of people.

This explains why a boy who was born after Nelson Mandela was released - and after democracy - harbours such deep hatred. You see, his parents instilled in him the same hatred and taught him that black people's lives are worth nothing so there is nothing wrong with killing them.

The role models of these young white children are their parents, who still harbour racial hatred and this naturally rubs off on the children.

Discouraging South Africans to talk openly about racism, especially in communities and at schools, including lack of white role models who criticise racism and harsh punishment for those who practise racism, does not help the situation.

It is shocking that in a country with such brutal race hatred there is not even one NGO dealing with racism and its effects.

There is now an opportunity for our justice system to give Johan Nell the harshest sentence as a way, not only of sending a message to racist white youth, but also to their parents, to start teaching their children correct values. If not, more of these racists will end up in jail and that is not a remedy for racism.

Luther Lebelo, Kyalami

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