Name-calling could leadto violence

The ANC leadership's namecalling and insults, which have become the order of the day since the departure of Mosiuoa Lekota and Mbhazima Shilowa, must stop at once.

The ANC leadership's namecalling and insults, which have become the order of the day since the departure of Mosiuoa Lekota and Mbhazima Shilowa, must stop at once.

A very sad aspect of this uncouth behaviour is that it is led by ANC president Jacob Zuma, who calls people snakes that are either dead or ironically resurrected and become poisonous at every turn.

His sycophantic disciples then also spit and hurl insults in a bid to affirm their loyalty to him and to sing for their supper.

The ANC must be aware that some among the masses interpret the insults as a call to arms. This manifested itself in Orange Farm, where ANC members disrupted a meeting.

ANC sympathisers have been given the impression that Lekota and company are committing a serious offence and breaking some holy ANC law. The organisation contradicts itself by saying people are free to leave and then attacks them with verbal vitriol when they do.

South Africa has a painful past. Just before 1994 an orgy of violence engulfed the country, fuelled by the same recklessness of people entrusted with leadership.

Enemies of our impending democracy exploited the feud labelled by some as "black-onblack" violence to further divide the masses. That time is still vivid in the minds of widows and orphans of political violence.

The ANC must put the interest of the country first.

Donato Shongwe, Randburg

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