Questions over parole

The release on parole of Mark Scott-Crossley, the Hoedspruit farmer who fed his former worker to the lions, continues to leave a bad stench in the public domain.

The release on parole of Mark Scott-Crossley, the Hoedspruit farmer who fed his former worker to the lions, continues to leave a bad stench in the public domain.

This is despite the position taken by the Department of Correctional Services that the parole board at Barberton Prison had followed all the required procedures in reaching its decision to grant him parole.

Pertinent questions still remain around how Scott-Crossley was paroled.

According to the family of Nelson Chisale, the man who was fed to the lions, the parole board did not involve them in the whole process.

They only heard about his release when the SABC contacted them for comment.

On the other hand, it has now been revealed that Scott-Crossley had jumped the parole queue. Several prisoners - serving sentences for less serious crimes - have been overlooked.

There is also the question of Scott-Crossley's behaviour that has to be taken into consideration.

During his stay in prison Scott-Crossley did not behave like a model prisoner. He was, instead, found guilty of assaulting a fellow prisoner and fined R4000.

The Department of Correctional Services must come out clean about their reasons for paroling him.

All what the Chisale family and the public want is justice.

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