First breast cancer on-line test launched

PinkLink, a breast cancer advocacy organisation, has launched an on-line assessment test aimed at helping women to detect the risk of breast cancer early.

PinkLink, a breast cancer advocacy organisation, has launched an on-line assessment test aimed at helping women to detect the risk of breast cancer early.

Breast cancer survivor and founder of PinkLink, Samantha Galliet, pictured, said the Breast Risk Assessment Tool (Bra Tool) is the first of its kind in South Africa to quickly estimate a woman's potential risk levels of breast cancer.

The test, which was funded by Canderel, involves six questions, which take a few minutes to complete and the results are calculated in seconds. The questions are based on the most important risk factors for breast cancer.

"The test will help women to gain a good understanding of the level of risk for breast cancer compared to another woman of the same age group," Galliet said.

"It is important to remember that the results of this calculator are not a guarantee of risk levels and that all women are at risk of developing breast cancer, no matter their risk category.

"The test will not tell you if you have breast cancer, but it will tell you if you are at risk of developing it. The only way you can be sure you have breast cancer is by visiting a doctor, who is experienced in diagnosing breast cancer.

"When I was diagnosed with breast cancer I often asked myself why and what were the risk factors involved. Breast cancer is one of the most curable cancers if detected early," she said.

"Most women are unaware of the risk factors for breast cancer and we hope to change that. By taking the test I hope that women will be more responsible for their own breast health and will be able to detect changes in their breast early and save their lives.

"According to the Breast Cancer Foundation, when the disease is detected early, the five-year survival rate is 96percent.

"As a survivor of breast cancer I want to raise more awareness around the disease and encourage women to regularly self-examine themselves and to receive regular testing," said Galliet.

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