Ban of hand-held weapons leaves us defenceless

I am really concerned that our government continues to look at the wrong places by banning a list of hand-held weapons that citizens can easily use to defend themselves against attack.

I am really concerned that our government continues to look at the wrong places by banning a list of hand-held weapons that citizens can easily use to defend themselves against attack.

As a man in South Africa, I feel absolutely emasculated because I am not able to defend our women who are sitting ducks.

A relative was attacked in her Mafikeng home as she was preparing to enjoy what seemed to be a wonderful Saturday morning. Alas, it wasn't to be.

Her attackers used a Trojan horse attack tactic to have her lower her guard. When they were nearer they took control and bound her and her 10-year-old granddaughter. Her son, who works in Johannesburg, was attacked in a robbery.

The latter happened after he had walked into a shop to cash a Lotto ticket. Unfortunately for him, a hold-up was in progress. Three months later his mother was attacked in a home that is supposed to be a safe haven.

Whenever I walk the streets anywhere in South Africa, I am armed with some sort of hand-held weapon. I am not prepared to let go because what I have witnessed is scary. My house was burgled while I was at work. Be it a disguised walking stick, a concealed baton or pocket knife, I will not allow our government to remove this last line of defence from me. It is my last chance to win back my masculinity.

Tshepang Sithole

Langa

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